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environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
francisco either through their work or given back to the environment through culture, through arts and through many of the hard work and we will unveil who will receive this dedication today. as many of you know trees are very important for our communities. they provide us shade, they deter water from going into our storm systems, they provide a place for birds and butterflies and of course they help us clean our air. arbor day is a very important event. it is celebrated not just in america, but all over the world and i'm honored that we are kicking this event. i would like to thank the mayor for bringing arbor day back to san francisco. this is our 8th arbor day. i will welcome mayor lee to the stage. >> thank you the dpw, the recreation department, to all of those who helped us in working today. arbor day, it is an annual celebration that we have struggled very hard to make sure this city appreciate because the trees are part of a great answer and solution to reducing carbon emissions and be sure we have greenery and beautification for our citizens. a lot of my friends celebrated
they have to go back to habits that they may have learned. whether from their families or environment they grew up in. i am cognizant of that, having grown up in public housing. and to get better. and to try to do that with the public housing residents now. to give hope to them. no matter where they are, sunnyvale or potrero. but to work with the families and it's not just brick and mortar. i want to give you my personal thoughts of bringing everyone together. it's worth it. it's worth every ounce of our energy to really fill in all the gaps. what makes me the saddest is when diag, and i and police chief suhr get the texts on the mornings where we see a victim of crime. and what i usually do is put a face on that. and i get characteristics. young black male. hispanic male. victim, 2 a.m. gunshot wound, sf general, did not survive. and i try to put my own face on that, which is the kids that i see that we try to graduate up. or middle school kids that i would have seen. what could i have done for them. whether some counseling or guidance. or some support to the family. and we can be ve
for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> a major security flaw has been uncovered that means could make it possible to change another user's apple id password and hijack the account! a step-by-step tutorial was found online by the technology site, the verge. it's now recommended that users enable apple id's two-step verification - to protect their accounts. that allows users to get a new code to their phones each time they want to use the apple account. apple says it's working on the problem. >> starting next wednesday -- the golden gate bridge toll plaza will look a little different. the toll takers will be gone - and all-electronic tolling will be in place. if you have fastrak, crossing the bridge will cost 5 dollars instead of six. other options. you can register you license plate online. make a one- time payment at one of the many kiosks around the bay area. or do nothing and t
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
the cats that are in this pretty complex environment and trying to get them moving in a common direction. >> general baldwin? >> first, i'm very, very encouraged at the direction the department of defense has taken in changing the way that we do support the civil authorities. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no visibility on what forces are available at camp pen
to encouraging stewardship of the environment. land conservation. watershed protection. and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional fundg provided by the cole come foundation. the wallace genetic foundation. the carpenter foundation and the charles afruoff foundation. >> this week on to the contrary: first, single families and the decline of men. then, leaning in or falling behind? "behind the headlines," the history of women in defense. ♪ ♪ >> hello. i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, are single families hurting men? new research shows the decades long decline in mens wages may be linked to the rise of single-parent families: the number of children living with two parents has declined by almost 20 percent during the past 40 years. the majority of single parent households are led by women. the struggles men face in the workforce may be both caused by and the effect of single parent house holds. men who don't make as much money or don't hold stable jobs are not attractive as partners so some women are
environments. but i did come away with the conclusion that it's absolutely vital that parents and staff and student come together around a shared vision of culture. either organically or through the very hard process of mutual dialogue and understanding. and i think the book shows the success that can happen when -- that can occur when that happens and the struggles a school will encounter if it doesn't. and as one example, one of the schools i followed, which struggled quite a bit in its first year, did have this one sort of amazing success on that point. the principal early on in the year introduced the students to the wolf fable, and the fable is there are two wolves inside us that are constantly fighting, and one wolf represents greed and anger and the other wolf represents love and humility. and the moral is that the wolf that wins at the end is the one you feed. and that 'really took on a life of its own at this school and among the kids, and students would tell each other to remember to be the good wolf, or to make sure that the go wolf wins in the end. i think at successful scho
earnings cycle. also in this environment the u.s. economy is growing more like 2% and a lot less like 4 in that environment pricing is going to be challenged and the top line sales is not going to be universal for all firms. it will be balance sheet by balance sheet and case by case. security collection becomes far more important. >> i was going to say as you point out the profit growth picture has been pretty good but we are getting at the mature point in that cycle and the forecast is about 1% or 2% overall growth. there are always ways to make more money than the index tracking would lead you to believe. where do you think the pockets of possible better than average profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, m
of time to continue to reduce crime and continue to create a safe environment and environment where we would not necessarily need to have this large investment in the criminal justice system. [ applause ] >> to mr. gas skon. if we were to eliminate money bail in effect turn over a decision whether or not someone is in custody to a judge whether or not they have been violator likely to reoffending or a flight risk, do you think that kind of system would likewise get accused of discrimination against the poor or racial minorities or do you think it would be more fair? >> i think it would be more fair. if you look at the fact that hispanics for instance are under the current system 4 percent more likely to be held on a pretrial setting than whites, 27 percent, we can show there is a disparity there. if we create a model that is based on evidence base risk factors that can be applied to the individual and the setting of that individual and can be done objectively not because an officer is making a decision but putting some kind of value system to those factors that are likely to impact r
need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> every single bite needed to be -- >> it's like a great big hug. >> about as spicy as i can handle. my parents put chili powder in my baby food. >> a lot of >>> hi, i'm leslie sbrocco. welcome to "check, please! bay area." the show where residents talk about their favorite restaurants. this week, production supervisor and food dude jeff kramer works on commercials, features, and tv shows. his mantra is hurry up and wait, so when it comes to the good food at his unusual venue, he doesn't mind waiting for what he calls a show-stopping meal. mike stephen works out any kinks in his restaurant. there are two ways to la
that a man and woman would provide a better environment than two mothers or two fathers. >> i'm not saying it should be illegal for that, but we should not change the definition of marriage in such a way that we enshrine in the law that a child does not deserve a mother or father. >> they announced their support for same-sex marriage saying that there is no evidence that sexual orientation of the parents has an impact on the child. rebecca is executive director of san francisco's center. >> they say significant charges in school and prejudice from the world having two same-sex parents, they turn out equally happy and equally successful in school and in life. >> reporter: the archbishop disdis agrees if the high court does legalize it his fear it will end the institution of marriage. >> what i feel would happen is that people just not be interested in marrying anymore. marriage will become irrelevant. >> he added the church will suffer. >> what we are teaching is bigotry and discrimination, we're not going to be allowed to do that. >> the archbishop believes that if church teachings are bel
and i think what you are probably saying is, you know, maybe we should consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional pane
the reaction was within the leadership of israel and i think they felt we finally have an environment in which we can talk constructively. >> talking about a two-state solution, there's some talk over there about a one-state solution. read the economist. one-state solution is a bad idea, correct? >> yes, i think it's a bad idea. >> should be two states. >> israel is never going to go for a one-state solution because they would soon be outnumbered by the palestinians. >> they will be outnumbered by the palestinians regardless of whether it's one state or not. >> they will not. >> eventually you would have a birks-national state. >> talking about -- >> well, the palestinians have the higher rate of population growth. >> correct. >> the theory is at some point they will overtake. >> 30 years. >> no, it's very close. >> there are five and a half pu barry and b b bromance. from the moment the president arrived at the airport in tel aviv there were smiles and jokes all around shared between president obama and israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. the two leaders held a press conference outside
have suffered. it's a low-interest environment, which makes stocks the only liquid investment game in town and that explains the market we're in. joining me is the the chief economist at rbs securities and ned riley, the ceo. i have laid out why the fed has fuld the rally. when you buy a stock, you're buying a share of its earnings. the price to earnings ratio used to figure out the value of a stock is still low. let's take a look here. i want to show our viewers. the s&p 500 is seeing average earnings of 15. that's the bottom bar. that's half of where they were. lower than where they were five years ago when the dow was trading at about where they are now. that makes me think this isn't just the federal reserve. what do you think? >> it isn't. as a matter of fact, the fear that's in people's hearts right at the moment, it reminds me of rodney dangerfield. the market has no respect. nobody has respect for this market that it is real. clearly we're seeing the public and institutions, i might point out, have been lowering their equity exposure. the the public only has 30% in ek equit
their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> president obama is in jordan tonight after wrapping up a visit to israel. it began with questions about just how well he would go over with the israeli people. his relationship with prime minister netanyahu after all has been strained at times. the question is would people pick up on the chill at the top or warm up to the president. we now have the answer and chief national correspondent john king tonight to tell us about it. john, a lot of speculation about what kind of reception the president might get in israel, how ordinary israelis, how leaders might react to him there. how did it go overall? >> reporter: anderson, i spent a lot of time in this region so you know what seems like concrete under your feet can suddenly turn to quicksand. the president will head home tomorrow feeling pretty happy especially on the point you just raised, reception among the israeli people. h
. capitalism is predicated on unlimited growth, but we live in a finite environment and we seem to have a dysfunctional democracy unable to resolve that contradiction. how do you see climate change and our diminishing natural resources such as fossil fuels and water impacting this crisis in capitalism? >> capitalism is a system geared up to doing three things on the part of business: get more profits, grow your company and get a larger market share. those are the driving bottom line issues. corporations are successful or not if they succeed in getting these objectives met. that's what their boards of directors are chosen to do, that's what their shareholders expect. that's the way the system works. if along the way they have to sacrifice either the well-being of their workers or the well-being of the planet or the environmental conditions, they may feel very bad about it, and i know plenty of them who do. but they have no choice. and they will explain if they're honest that that's the way this system works. so we have despoiled our environment in a classic way. that's why we have huge c
to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the environment that the marines ca
with the department environment of san francisco. this is actually going to be the highest rated lead which stands for leadership and energy environmental design. it's the lead goal at the top level. let's hear it for our friends from the department of environment. particularly mike palmer they are all here to be with us. another group that was dedicated to make sure the entire project was complete on time is the commission. they gave us time. lee is the commissioner. >> thank you, lee, i know there are several other commissioners in the audience, we have theresa ono. let's give them a big round of [ applause applause. they deserve our acknowledgment. now we have people who have helped with the fund raising and the building capacity for the library. friends of the library, scott. >> thank you, louis. it's a great pleasure to be with friends. this was a community effort where we had donations from $3 to a $100,000. there is a whole bunch of you, c'mon up. because these were the folks raising the money here in your community for this beautiful branch. [ applause ] also we have diane gray who is go
in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in
to tenants that it's worth paying more for a retrofit unit. we need all stake holders in the environment to receive that. >> thank you very much. next speaker? >> good afternoon supervisors, my name is michael wills. i'm an architect and earthquake safety group. i speak in favor of this program because it shows a common sense foresight to have an ordinance that offers and approach to strengthening, financing and a sensitivity to keeping people in their homes. after seeing and working with the details on patrick's committee, i think the city can be proud of this ordinance. it's one that has been drafted with care to all the concerns and not only of the technical seismic committee, technical and seismic professionals, but to the real sense itivity and keeping people in their homes and bringing the financial along with it shows that this is a program that will take care to make sure that all have access to the things that we all wants which is to make a safer, more residue resilient city. so i strongly urge this. >> thank you very much. next speaker. >> good afternoon supervisors, my name
in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years sea-going experience serving across various frig
approximately 3 to 5 days of solid training to make sure that they are going to be working in a safe environment to learn what's going on. and most of the time that, the incidents in california will become mitigated. now, not to say that we certainly have that as an option. we have a fairly robust what we call fire crew program using cdcr inmate fire fighters. it is on our radar and it's something that we have as a contingency if we needed to do it. >> lieutenant colonel. >> yes, general, in the mou it does address the ground portion but the focus of effort is mainly on the aviation side but it is built in there for the ground side if necessary. >> i just want to say in 2008 we did activate hand crews to fight fires and we've identified soldiers throughout the state to respond if needed. they've got the tools that they need, the boots and all that cached and available. it's really just a matter of getting the call and being ready to go. >> i was going to end with general myat. i know we've trained soldiers to do that kind of thing. after the colorado fires just recently they did put a lot o
and local authorities that meet globally every year and the networking cities around work and environment, transportation, immigration, security, and a number of other issues. i hadn't heard of it two years ago. i doubt too many people other than that the urban specialists in the room have heard of it. but it is a living organization. most people would say i know what you mean the american conference of mayors, sister cities, maybe. but they pale in the context of the actual inner city organizations literally hundreds of them. some regional, some of national, some with global scope that exist. the forty cities working on forty or fifty eight cities working on global environment doing a better job. mayors running the world. city protocol and new organization, barcelona that shares best practicing clare, the counsel of local authority, the climate alliance. achievings in the nations states are lock up. unable to make any real progress. they are actually doing things important things together, and they do it because when you look at cities, the approach to govern mans, the approach to citize
it back here, but they're worried bringing it here and having it here under this environment. there's an amazing opportunity being lost. >> neil: think about if you're looking at the economy turning around and betting on a turn-around obviously you would use that money and invest in plants and equipment and new shops and all. but what a lot of these companies tend to do, boost the dividends, buy back stock, and maybe take out a competitor, but they don't expand. >> well, one of the problems with apple is, i mean, it's got a problem because it's too successful. it's got this cash and you want to be careful that you don't do something stupid with it and apple keeps selling more iphones by spending more money and avoid making acquisitions. and sisco bought the flip video camera and the fact that they were able to sit on it, is an indicator of how well it's doing. >> neil: charlie. >> i would say this is a big debate in america. jeff immelt said in a world where you have to worry about terrorism at any point you need a lot of cash on hand, what that might do to your business. >> neil: a
about why the cd vs good but in terms of how we change the environment it's more than just changing the city's atmosphere the real magic is because we do all these things but it changes
about it having it here under this environment. there is an amazing opportunity being lost. >> neil: think about if you are looking at the economy turning around and betting on a turnaround you would use that money and invest in equipment, new shops. what a lot of these companies tend to do is boost their dividend, buy back stock, take out a competitor but they don't expand? >> one of the problems with apple it's got a problem because it's too successful. you want to be careful that you don't do something with it. apple can't sell more iphones by spending more money. it needs to avoid making acquisitions, cisco bought the flip camera business and it was a disaster because the company was under pressure to spend the money. the fact of sitting on the money is how well they are doing. >> i would say this is a big debate in corporate america. imelt addressed it in a world that you have to worry about terrorism you need to keep a lot of cash on hand. >> neil: sit good or bad sign to you? >> it's not good. tax reform would help, but i assure you apple is not afraid of repay tree eighting
and meanders under a canopy of oaks yup lipid u.s. and chill out in this pleasant and quiet environment and you might see butter nice, and dandelion and is squirrels hundred dollaring for their next meal and buena vista park is 88 recreation and park commission. >> arata. >> here. >> commissioner bonilla. >> here. >> commissioner harrison. >> here. >> commissioner martin. >> here. >> and commissioner levitan is on her way. just to a few reminders for those joining us this is the rec and park meeting for march 21, 2013. we welcome you today but we ask that you turn off electronic devices that may go off during the proceedings. we ask if you have a secondary conversation take it outside for the meeting to run as efficiently as possible. unless announced by the president of the commission each person has three minutes to speak under public comment. as a reminder we have public comment on item four and then -- and that is for 15 minutes total and then again continued on item number 10. please address your comments to the commission during public comment on items. in order to allow equal time t
nightmare is someone coming into a secure environment such as a school. we are actively investigating this case to make sure that we can find out what exactly happened. >> reporter: parents say they are grateful the boy knew what to do to get away. >> i commend the little boy for having the mind state to do what he did and make sure he made it home safely. >> i commend his parents because somebody talked to him in order to know how to get away from somebody. the fact that he did get away amazing. >> reporter: and a very brave young man. tonight the district superintendent tells me that the district should have called police sooner. she says the principal was trying to conduct his own internal investigation to figure out whether or not another student perhaps was behind the grabbing. now, the school did send out a phone message to parents last night. they will be holding a special meeting next monday at 6:00 to answer questions and concerns from parents. reporting live i'm jodi hernandez, nbc bay area news. >> thanks for the update. >>> the oakland police department has promoted the fi
been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>. >> greta: here a question for you. what do you think is more important to the american people keeping the white house open for tourists or elvis cruises? we know what the majority of the united states senate think and tom coburn. nice to see you senator. apparently, i have an amendment and it was voted down. tell me first what the amendment was. i'm going to ask you questions about it? >> what we did is eliminate a bunch of wasteful spending and transfer that money to the national park service so we can open up our major parks on time this spring and also give the park service money so that we can open up the white house. the excuse has been the white house can't be open up because secret service have been furloughed but if you look at the numbers they haven't been furloughed. so it has to do with
be operational environment. >> you sound confident that that will lead to improvements, any standards that need to be created making sure they -- >> they have 50 different entries petition from 37 states that involved. the six identified in the reauthorization bill you quoted, those are being funded by the states themselves with certification from the michael toscano a. in the future you may see every state that has their own test site in order to be able to assure the technology being deployed in the national airspace is safe. >> annie stepanovich, some proponents of drone technology have argued current safeguards provide significant protection of privacy and they know it's we have on the books related to the technology, losses already on the books related to use of other technologies that can overlap and include this type of technology. certain remedies that provide certain remedies for violations of those laws. some have suggested these legal protection should apply equally to drones and that they may be sufficient to alleviate any constitutional problems for any privacy concerns. in your vi
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ ...it's my job to look after it. been waiting for the price then hurry, sleep train's beautyrest and posturepedic closeout sale ends sunday. save up to 40% on closeout sets from beautyrest and posturepedic. save hundreds on floor samples and closeout inventory. these prices are falling fast, but these deals won't last. sleep train's beautyrest and posturepedic closeout sale ends sunday. superior service, best selection, lowest price, guaranteed. ♪ sleep train ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ >>> president obama is in jordan tonight after wrapping up a visit to israel. it began with questions about just how well he would go over with the israeli people. his relationship with prime minister netanyahu after all has been strained at times. the question is would people pick up on the
produce new life he said it's just common sense a man and woman would provide a better environment than two mothers or two fathers. i asked if he would oppose gay couple that's want to have had children. >> not saying it should be illegal that have but we should not enshrine in the law of principle a child does not deserve a mother and a father. >> this week the leading group of pediatricians saying there is no evidence that sexual orientation of parents has impact on the child. >> in spite of the fact they face challenges in schools and prejudices from the world those children are still turning out just equally well adjusted and happy, equally successful in school, in life. >> he disagrees saying if high court does legalize gay marriage his fear is that it will end the institution of marriage. >> i fear people will not be interested in marrying anymore. marriage will be irrelevant vent he added the church will suffer. >> if what we're teaching is bigotry and discrimination we're not going to be allowed to do that. >> believing if church teachings are backward it will impact the church-
the appealing independent environment alive on the fillmore, thank you. >> thank you. >> next speaker, please? >> hi, commissioners, (inaudible) i am the president of the san francisco council of district merchant associations. this appeal is about the permit for the foundation repairs not the seismic and i have worked in the construction business and i am aware of what they are trying to do, i do come mend the (inaudible) it is a big deal with ada and accessibility. but what we are concerned about is this is tied into the lease? is this what is being done is going to back with oska they want this to be done? otherwise they won't sign the lease? and i want to make sure this is not tied in and a separate thing. i would like to see the permit to be okay to give the permission that it does not relate to oska the way that i am hearing it. at the same time i would like to be assured and guaranteed that it is not tied in any way to oska that it is just to repair the foundation needed and put in the handicapped bathroom and they can search for a business that will not be a retail that this may be. m
by side and see what kinds of things come up in that environment and how we can work out those gaps. >> yeah, i would agree. i think my take away would be that we should exercise together, small table tops initially and we can always develop larger ones, to really understand the capabilities and further plan and also how integration would work during a big disaster. >> so first i would tell my boss, major general steve, sir, this was a very successful demonstration of our medical surge cape pblt and it was well done. but now we need to evolve and keep moving this forward. what we did on this particular time was stand-alone demonstrations of our particular capabilities. i think the next thing we need to do is a joint demonstration. for example, our shock trauma has many similarities to a dmat that might be a next step in the evolution of this type event. it also, after discussing with several members of the hospitals during the tour yesterday, it's clear that there are many other civilian military training opportunities that exist. those can be maybe collaboration between medical
in a non-crisis environment so that when they have to do it anywhere in the world, they've got one extra training day. that's the way we look at it, it's all one extra training day. you add all that up, we have a lot better chance when we need it. with that, i'm going to bring up dejon and take over the panel and i'll talk to you shortly. >> thank you, rob. the panelists we have represent a broad group of participants, some of them participated themselves and some of them had individuals in their organizations participate. and i want them to start with an introduction of who they are, a little bit about their own background, so you understand the lens they were looking through when they were providing some of their answers today. starting with our 3 panelists that were part of our command and control exercise then we'll hear from our 3 panelists that were in our communications drill. >> lieutenant commander mike kress, operations officer at naval beach group 1, i was a coach during the exercise. we supported the exercise with 3 subject matter experts from amphibious construction batt
years on the advisory council of the department of the environment's initiative called bc3, the business council on climate change. and she is currently on the board of friends of the urban forest. and laura is also an author. so, in her spare time she wrote a book called "at home in the northern forest." laura lives with her husband darrell and children liam and [speaker not understood]. her husband and son are here today. she is proud of a street tree and sidewalk garden and want to see more of though in the sunset. for that, i'd like to thank laura for all your service in the community. (applause) >> thank you so much, supervisor tang, and also thanks to carmen chu who helped select me for this recognition. i'm really so, so honored to have been chosen and to share the spotlight for a few hours today with this amazing and inspiring group of women. thank you so much. i chose to apply my science and policy education towards sustainability. i have worked for more than 15 years in community forestry, conservation based development, water quality science, fixing national environmental prog
and shut up. all of those things they do that might kill them are exploring their environment. so you have to give them light. don't let them give themselves but give them latitude. you don't need to create a special program to entice people. the very active exploring the solar system does that. looking for life, that's biologist and when you build frontiers in space -- >> we need to think bigger. >> think big and the rest flows behind it. you can create an innovation nation. they should remain nasa the department of innovation. i'm inspired to innovate because the nation is dreaming big. >> the rest of the world comes to see how america innovates. we have creativity. what drives them. >> you want to create an atmosphere in which innovation is a natural thing that everyone just does every day. >> i'm inspired. thank you. nice to see you. have a great weekend. >>> also inspiring, this crossing guard used to cross up defenders in the nba. he's even in the hall of fame. i'm going to tell you who he is and why this may be the smartest move he's made since he stepped off the court. the powerful
and significant and they have introduced us to major performers in a quality environment and comedians and singer and instrumentalist and they want to bring the people to the city and provide two of these audiences significant, really world class entertainment. i believe that they want to do the right thing. i do believe that they want to respect their neighbors and want to play by the rules and let's try to find a way to do that within the confines of the sounds or whatever the complaints are and i have worked with them because of the last ten years they have enabled me to do some holiday shows and they have helped me raise tens of thousands of dollars for the aids emergency fund and that is just another component that room makes available. let's find a way to make them play by the rules let's not prevent it from enriching our city's night life and introducing us and supporting deserving charitable organizations, i urge you to grant this temporary permit and let's find a way to keep the razz room. >> thank you. >> >> madam chair, everyone, tonight. my name is cathy jackson and i'm the agent, man
people together. partly it was the environment and the sicks that we had to confront -- circumstances that we had to cold front. as nk what has changed is she said we would work longer weeks and people were there for longer periods of time. the venues for communication were at hand. she will remember this well. we used to have two lunch tables that were just for senators and you sit family style. people would have lunch together. for whatever reason that lunchroom was closed. we used to have social events where we getting together and one was around our spouses and we would salute our spouses. we would do things like that. people now leave washington more routinely on thursday or fridays and they don't come back until monday or tuesday. you are left to combovepb on wednesday. you condition govern a country as big and sophisticated a this is. they were in session for 11 days in february. partly, we have to ground the airplane. you have to stay here. i like the suggestion that maybe what we out to do is have blocks of time where you don't go home. you're there from january to june then
'll create an environment that will be hard on you. the weekend forecast shapes out like this. increasing clouds which is good. we still need rain. in some places we're at 77% of average. we haven't had significant rain since december. >> we had the big rush early, a lot of storms then nothing. all right, bill. thank you. >>> a common seasoning is killing people. the new science it draws the link to more than 2 million deaths in more than one year. >> also ahead a baby shot and killed while sitting in his stroller. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios ♪ the one and only, cheerios >>> police in georgia have arrested two teenagers suspected in the shooting death of a 14 -month-old baby. a woman told police two men approached her and demanded money. she told police when she said she didn't have any they shot her in her leg and shot and killed her son in his stroller. police picked up two teenagers after they canvassed school records and community. >>> offi
environment. >> i am glad you brought up the fact that you're dealing with the c.r.'s. it has been suggested that this is on you. let's take the timeout the last three years. was it your idea to pass a 14- day continuing resolution or a 21-day continuing resolution? or a seven-day, 165-day, a one- day, a six-day? how you run a government or a branch of government with c.r.'s that go for that short amount of time? how do you adequately budget for that? >> it is very difficult. we err on the side of being conservative, as we have here, to make sure we are not deficient at the end of any given continuing resolution. it is difficult. we are a very large operation. we are taking in over 400,000 people a year. and if it has to go on for the full year. when you are in an environment where you do not know what your budget is going to be on the various marks and the house and the senate are different, when you are looking at sequestration, it is a challenge and you do your best under the circumstances to come up with the right answer. >> as you went through the releases and you sit here today, do you
about being a woman in this environment, in this lean in time that cheryl sandberg talked about, and, you know, just overall what your views are. >> it's not something i think about a lot. with sherylout now, it is interesting to think about. i think that there's no difference between male and female ceos, and i think it's nice to get attention from a female ceo, but i would rather be recognized as a ceo. shibani: it was on this day in business back in 1894 that the very first stanley cup championship took place. the trough my was awarred to montreal defeating the ottawa generals, and it's passed on every year, and current holders are the l.a. kings. the trophy was named after then governor general of canada, lord stanley presston, and last year, nearly 3 million people in the united states tuned in to watch the finals and the average ticket price of the first game was $833, and by game five, the price went up to more than a thousand dollars a ticket. well, it's the oldest trough my competed for by pofessional at athletes in north america, and it was played today, march 22, 119 years
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